Danish Windmill Circa 1887, Now A Charming Countryside Home Near Beaches! – Fårevejle, Denmark – $439,000

 A Danish windmill circa 1887, now a charming countryside home near sandy beaches!
Danish Windmill Circa 1887, Now A Charming Countryside Home Near Beaches! – Fårevejle, Denmark – $439,000

Happy Wednesday! A Danish windmill circa 1887, now a charming countryside home near sandy beaches!

I finally ventured into the wondrous world of Danish homes, and you are in for a treat! There are so many beautiful, sunny, historic homes to share with you – can’t wait to post a bunch! This windmill caught my attention in particular because not only is it such a unique structure from the exterior, with a beautiful location, all of the books and windows and organic charm of the interior had me totally in love. What do you think?

From the listing on Ivan Eltoft Nielsen, clumsily translated from Danish:

Ordrup Mill is located high. It makes a windmill now once, and preferably as high as possible, because this is where the wind is best. But it is also here that the view is best over Sejerøbugten. Like most wind turbines, Ordrup Mill was built in the 19th century. There are not many left, and those that are have been renovated to the historical memory of the time once, but quite a few have also been renovated for habitation. The octagonal construction on all floors is an interesting experience, not only because load-bearing structures today are simple and tucked away in walls and ceilings, but also because square and rectangular spaces are the ones we usually find ourselves in. Each floor has it incomparable view, from the sub-mill to the upper-mill. We are on the top of Ordrup, and the view of the beautiful Ordrup Næs peninsula is so clear that the map could have been drawn with a pencil here. In the water are Sejerø and Nekselø. And on the horizon, Samsø is seen on the clearest day. Ordrup Mill was built in 1887 and was originally a watermill and from the end of the 16th century. The grain mill was discontinued in the 1940s, and after being empty for a number of years, for approx. 1955 set up a café and later a patisserie. The wind turbines are an important legacy in Danish cultural history. They ground grain into flour and gave us bread on the table. The mills were important in an agricultural country, hence the saying ‘he who comes first to the mill gets painted first,’ to be operated in the order in which one approaches. But if you are the happy owner of the mill, there is probably no reason to hurry.

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